MERS

MERS Has Infected 77 People in the Middle East

The coronavirus, I mean, not the huge mortgage clearinghouse that “owns” half the mortgages in the United States and basically invented robo-signing.

cf “Santorum”

How MERS Grew from a Solution Into a Problem

MERS, the Mortgage Electronic Registry System, is a legal fiction that—on paper—owns about half the mortgages in the United States. It was created in 1995 as a solution to the problem of slow-moving county property records offices. Banks and investors needed mortgages to move faster, so they registered once with the county in the name of MERS . . . and then basically lost track of the paperwork.

The New York Times explains why, but here’s the gist of it.

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Debt Collection & Bankruptcy News Roundup, Week of March 7th, 2011

Debt collection and bankruptcy news has been piling up in my queue, and since I can’t hope to give each post the attention it deserves, here is a grand roundup.

And, finally, your daily dose of harassing debt collection calls, thanks to ConsumerESQ:

Massachusetts Supreme Court Stops Wells Fargo and US Bank Foreclosures

Today, the Massachusetts Supreme Court decided that if Wells Fargo and US Bank couldn’t keep track of their property, the court wasn’t going to help them take that property away from the consumers living in it. In other words, the “produce the note” strategy not only works, it is the law. At least in Massachusetts.

This decision could spill over into other states, since the foreclosure process in Massachusetts is similar to other states that permit non-judicial foreclosure. Besides, taking property without competent evidence kind of flies in the face of the Due Process Clause.

The Massachusetts court did point a way forward for the banks: valid assignments. Well, obviously. Unfortunately, the court also said the banks cannot go back and get retroactive assignments, so banks that kept similarly shoddy paperwork may be SOL for the mortgages they think they hold now.

Of course, my guess is that, rather than adopt the court’s reasonable, legal suggestion, the banks will spend millions of dollars lobbying Congress to overturn the Due Process Clause, or something.

Sure you owe somebody for your mortgage loan, but who?

Sure you owe somebody for your mortgage loan, but who? Since lenders buy and sell loans so frequently, many are unable to prove they own the loans they hold, resulting in as much as $2.1 trillion in “orphan” loans. Says former foreclosure victim Joe Lents: “If you’re going to take my house away from me, you better own the note.” Word. [via BoingBoing]